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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
This is a chronological list of games in the Alien, Predator and Alien vs. Predator science fiction horror franchises. There have been thirty-eight officially licensed video games, one trading card game, and one tabletop miniatures game released as tie-ins to the three franchises. The first video game connected to the Alien franchise was released in 1982, based on the 1979 film Alien. Subsequent games were based on that film and its sequels Aliens (1986), Alien 3 (1992), and Alien Resurrection (1997). The first video game in the Predator franchise was released in 1987, the same year as the Predator film on which it was based. Subsequent Predator games were based on that film and its sequels Predator 2 (1990) and Predators (2010). The first game to cross the two franchises was Alien vs Predator, released in September 1993 and based on an earlier comic book series. Since then the characters and storylines of the two franchises have been officially crossed over in comic books, video games, and the feature films Alien vs. Predator (2004) and Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem (2007). To date, there have been seventeen officially licensed video games released based on the Alien franchise, six based on the Predator franchise, and fourteen based on the Alien vs. Predator crossover imprint. These have been created by various developers and released for a variety of platforms including video game consoles, handheld game consoles, personal computers, and mobile phones. The Aliens vs. Predator Collectible Card Game published in 1997 and the Alien vs. Predator themed sets for HorrorClix released in 2006 are the only non-video games in the franchises. The stories of the games are set in a fictional universe in which alien races and species have dangerous conflicts with humans and with each other. The games pit human, Alien, and Predator characters against one other in various fights for survival. The settings of the games vary, with most of the stories taking place far in the future.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Art of Fighting is a video game trilogy in the genre of competitive fighting game titles that were released for the Neo Geo platform in the early 1990s. It was the second fighting game franchise created by SNK, following the Fatal Fury series and is set in the same fictional universe as a prequel to the Fatal Fury series. The original Art of Fighting was released in 1992, followed by two sequels: Art of Fighting 2 in 1994 and Art of Fighting 3: The Path of the Warrior in 1996. It was the first fighting game by SNK to feature the character designs of former illustrator Shinkiro, who would go on to do the character designs for the later Fatal Fury and The King of Fighters games.
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Fight, July 9, 2016
Art of Fighting (龍虎の拳, Ryūko no Ken, lit. "Fist of Dragon and Tiger") is a video game trilogy in the genre of competitive fighting game titles that were released for the Neo Geo platform in the early 1990s. It was the second fighting game franchise created by SNK, following the Fatal Fury series and is set in the same fictional universe as a prequel to the Fatal Fury series. The original Art of Fighting was released in 1992, followed by two sequels: Art of Fighting 2 (龍虎の拳2, Ryūko no Ken 2) in 1994 and Art of Fighting 3: The Path of the Warrior (ART OF FIGHTING 龍虎の拳 外伝, Art of Fighting: Ryūko no Ken Gaiden) in 1996.
Art of Fighting was the first fighting game by SNK to feature the character designs of former illustrator Shinkiro, who would go on to do the character designs for the later Fatal Fury and The King of Fighters games.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Ashita no Joe ("Tomorrows Joe") is a boxing game based on the manga of the same name. In English, the title is sometimes translated as Rocky Joe or Success Joe, as was the case with the earlier Neo Geo Ashita no Joe title Legend of Success Joe, which saw a US localization. The game follows the manga somewhat, presenting a series of increasingly more challenging fighters for the gifted bantamweight Joe Yabuki, the protagonist, to fight. The game plays a little more like a traditional fighter game than something like Punch Out!!, presenting a side view of the two fighters with a combat system that involves punching and blocking.
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Fight, Action, July 30, 2016
Variable Geo, also known as V.G., is a Japanese 2D fighting game / eroge series developed and published by Giga for home computers. It was also developed and published by Technical Group Laboratory (TGL) for home game consoles. It focuses on an all-female martial arts competition where participants are required to promote various family restaurants by acting as waitresses when not fighting.
Thats a hack of V.G.
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Action, Fight, July 9, 2016
Ballz is a two-player 3D action fighting game for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis, the Super NES (SNES) and the 3DO. It was developed by PF Magic and published by Accolade in 1994. The 3DO version was released as a directors cut in 1995. Ballz offered three difficulty levels over a total of 21 matches. Its distinguishing quality was that each of the characters were composed completely of balls, with a pseudo-3D look. Although the game was not a tremendous success, PF Magic reused its graphics technology in a successful line of virtual pet titles, Petz, Dogz, Catz and Oddballz.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Bastard!!: Heavy Metal, Dark Fantasy is a manga by Kazushi Hagiwara. It first appeared in Weekly Sh?nen Jump, in 1988, and continues to be published irregularly today in Ultra Jump. Currently, it spans 27 volumes. Kazushi Hagiwara is an enthusiastic fan of heavy metal music and Dungeons & Dragons, using ideas from both of these in the Bastard!! story. Many characters and places in the story, for instance, are named after members of Hagiwaras favorite bands. Hagiwara also attributes the manga Devilman by Go Nagai as a primary influence on his artwork.
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Action, Fight, July 9, 2016
Battle Blaze is a 1992 medieval fighting released for the Arcade and Super Nintendo Entertainment System by Sammy Studios. It is where players use swords, morningstars, knives, and other weapons to beat up their opponents. The player can either play in a colosseum or on a quest. The eventual goal is defeat the Dark Lord who lives in a castle in the sky.
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Action, Fight, July 9, 2016
Best of the Best is a 1989 American martial arts film directed by Bob Radler, and produced by Phillip Rhee, who also co-stars in the film. The film also starring Eric Roberts, James Earl Jones and Christopher Penn. The plot revolves around a team of American taekwondoin facing a team of Koreans in a taekwondo tournament. Several subplots pop up in the story - moral conflicts, the power of the human spirit triumphing over adversity are some themes.
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Fight, Action, August 12, 2016
The second season of the Sailor Moon anime series, titled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R, was produced Toei Animation and directed by Junichi Sato and Kunihiko Ikuhara. According to the booklet from the Sailor Moon Memorial Song Box, the letter "R" stands for the word "Romance".
Like the rest of the series, it follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Sailor Soldiers. The first 13 episodes consist of the "Makaiju arc", while the "Black Moon Clan" arc adapts the fourth to the seventh volumes of the manga by Naoko Takeuchi. After defeating the Dark Kingdom, the Sailor Soldiers encounter the Makaiju aliens. Afterwards, the Black Moon Clan starts planning an operation to steal energy at the Star Points of the future Crystal Tokyo, forcing the Sailor Soldiers to confront them with her daughter from the future, Chibiusa.
The season aired from March 6, 1993 to March 12, 1994 on TV Asahi in Japan. The season was then licensed and heavily edited for a dubbed broadcast and DVD release in English by DIC Entertainment. It was the last season to be dubbed by DIC. The first 25 episodes of their adaptation were aired on the Canadian channel YTV from October 25 to November 28, 1995. Eventually, the remaining 17 episodes aired from October 4 to November 21, 1997, omitting only one of the seasons 43 episodes. Starting with the third season, Cloverway Inc. took over dubbing new episodes for broadcast on Cartoon Network. Later, ADV Films rereleased the series in a subtitle-only DVD box set, which also omitted Episode 67 from the release. Eventually, in 2014, Viz Media began redubbing the series from the start. In the 1994 "favorite episode" polls for Animage, "Protect Chibiusa! Clash of the 10 Warriors" came in eighth place. The following year, "The Final Battle Between Light and Darkness! Love Sworn to the Future" came in seventh place.
This season makes use of two pieces of theme music: one opening theme and one ending theme. The opening theme, titled "Moonlight Densetsu" , is performed by the idol group DALI. The ending theme "Otome no Policy" is performed by Yoko Ishida. DIC Entertainment used an English-language version of the Japanese opening theme as both the opening and ending theme.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Sailor Moon SuperS: Zenin Sanka!! Shuyaku Soudatsusen was a fighting video game released for the Super Nintendo on March 29, 1996. It was a sequel to the game Sailor Moon S: Jougai Rantou!? Shuyaku Soudatsusen.

The main plot of the game, developed in the story mode, was that the Sailor Senshi were fighting to choose a new leader. After defeating an enemy, Sailor Moon was teased by Sailor Chibi Moon and Sailor Mars, who called her undependable. The rest of the Sailor Senshi then decided to have a contest to choose a new leader. The Senshi chosen by the player must then fight every one of the Solar System Senshi, including Sailor Saturn, who was missing in the previous game. If the player beat every Senshi, that character obtained the leadership, which meant that the the main screen of the game and the begining of the story mode changed to reflect it.

The system was similar to that of the Street Fighter games, with secret moves, special techniques, and desperation attacks which were available either when the Sailor Senshi had almost run out of energy or when it was ten seconds before time over. The techniques were performed by a combination of buttons, but there was an "auto" mode in the game with easier shorcuts.

Besides story mode, there were two "versus" modes (against the game and against a second player), a "tournament" mode, and a "training" mode, where the player could learn and practice the characters moves.

In every mode except tournament and training the player could access the "Ability Customize System," in which the player had ten points (or fifteen in versus mode) to distribute between several aspects of the character, including their special attack, physical attacks, physical strength, playfulness (which increased the chance that an attack would not work, leaving the character vulnerable and unable to move for several seconds), defense, and ? (an option which increased the strength of the characters desperation attack).

All ten Solar System Senshi were available in the game, but not in every mode. Only Sailor Moon, the four Inner Senshi, and Sailor Chibi Moon were available for play in the story mode, even though the Outer Senshi had to be defeated in that mode. The Outer Senshi could, however, be used as playable characters in other modes. Tuxedo Mask appeared to talk about the Senshis perfomance in battles, but he was not playable in any mode.

Each character normally used attacks from the Sailor Moon SuperS season, but previous techniques such as Moon Tiara Action and Venus Love-Me Chain were present too. Even when Sailor Chibi Moon was in her Super form she could use Pink Sugar Heart Attack with the Pink Moon Stick. Some attacks from the manga were present as well, such as Jupiter Coconut Cyclone, Chronos Typhoon, or Mars Snake Fire. There were also attacks created specifically for the video games, such as Silence Buster, Action Spinster, or Fire Heel Drop.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Bishoujo Wrestler Retsuden: Blizzard Yuki Rannyuu is a Strategy game, published by KSS, which was released in Japan in 1996.
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Fight, July 9, 2016
Brawl Brothers, known in Japan as Rushing Beat Run (ラッシング・ビート乱 複製都市, Rasshingu BRan: Fukusei Toshi, "Rushing Beat Chaos: The City of Clones"), is a side-scrolling beat 'em up game developed and published by Jaleco for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1992. It is the second game in the Rushing Beat series, after Rival Turf!, and was followed by The Peace Keepers in 1993.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
Cho Aniki is a Japanese video game series originally developed by Masaya and published by NCS Corp. The first game debuted in 1992 for the PC Engine system. The games sequels and spin-offs later appeared on the Super Famicom, Wonderswan, Sega Saturn, PlayStation, and PlayStation 2. Mainly consisting of side-scrolling shoot em up in the vein of Gradius, the Cho Aniki series is best known for its homoerotic overtones, wacky humor and vivid, surreal imagery. Most of the games have never seen release outside Japan.
For various reasons, the popularity of the Cho Aniki games has endured since the series debut. Highlights of the various games include in-game music, innovative control schemes or sheer kitsch value. In Japan, these games are examples of baka-ge, a type of kuso-ge. "Baka-ge" literally means "idiot game" while "kuso-ge" literally means "shitty game" or "shit game". Baka-ges appeal lies in its campness. Indisputably, the games aesthetic sense semi-nude muscular men in suggestive homoerotic poses is a unique one, certainly a quality that has given the series a cult popularity among Western gamers. Though the graphics are more risque than pornographic, the series references homosexuality and gay sex more directly and more often than perhaps any other video game series in history.
Occasionally, the title is transliterated as "Choaniki", "Chou Aniki", or (erroneously) "Cho Eniki". The rights to the series are currently owned by Extreme Co., Ltd., which had obtained the rights of NCS Corp. and Masaya products and trademarks.
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Fight, Action, July 9, 2016
ClayFighter is a fighting game released for the Super NES in 1993 and later ported to Mega Drive/Genesis in 1994. It has been re-released on Nintendos Virtual Console along with the two Earthworm Jim games and Boogerman, which are also by Interplay.
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